The American Medical Association (AMA) strongly encourages international medical graduates (IMGs) to participate in U.S. Clinical Experiences (USCE) before deciding to apply to a residency program in the United States. Most, if not all, residency positions require at least 3 months of USCE. Entering an AMOpportunities experience puts you one step ahead by providing these experiences.

 

Based on your performance in an AMOpportunities clinical experience, you will have the opportunity to earn a letter of recommendation from your physician preceptor. These letters of recommendation are significant, especially when applying to a U.S. or European residency program. The importance of the letter and the weight it carries in your application is determined by its content and its author’s credentials, rather than what letterhead it is written on.

 

A strong letter of recommendation helps provide you the credibility you need within the American clinical system. United States residency programs will look at this letter as an indication of your abilities. The physician author’s academic affiliations, the clinical sites you visited, and the activities that took place are generally the most valuable aspects of the letter. While residency programs will accept letters from references in your home country, the letter of recommendation you earn through your AMOpportunities experience gives you a professional reference from a U.S. physician preceptor vouching for your clinical skills.

 

While an AMOpportunities clinical experience is only four weeks, it has a lasting impact. Through AMOpportunities, you are not only enriching your medical knowledge but also setting yourself up for more opportunities down the line. The letter of recommendation you receive upon completing an AMOpportunities experience allows you to take those next steps should you decide to pursue a residency program in the United States, Europe, or any country you choose.  


Shereen Al-Sawwaf
Shereen Al-Sawwaf

Shereen is a content writer with AMO and seeks to make the complex process of obtaining a U.S. medical rotation or observership easier for international medical personnel.

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