Women's HIstory Month Week One

Women’s History Month: Social Advocates to Physicians of the 1800’s

Social Advocates to Physicians of the 1800’ss Despite its current title–Women’s History Month–the first national celebration began humbly as Women’s History Week in 1981. It wasn’t until 1987 that the petition for a month-long celebration was confirmed. Throughout Women’s History Month this March, AMO will honor female physicians of the past and present by sharing […]

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Handshake

How Physicians Can Care for Undocumented Immigrants

Physicians and Undocumented Immigrants Known as the “melting pot,” the United States is home to a diverse population of individuals, a significant number of which are undocumented. The current population of undocumented immigrants sits at just over ten million. Despite this number’s annual decrease since 2012, the presence of undocumented immigrants in labor intensive positions […]

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Blurred Hospital Background

Inpatient vs. Outpatient Care

An important distinction in the U.S. healthcare system is the distinction between inpatient vs. outpatient care. Though both types treat patients, they differ in where, how, and to what extent patients are treated and how patients pay for treatment.

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Globe and Stethoscope

The Missing Conversation in the U.S. Healthcare Crisis

The U.S. healthcare crisis is often talked about in terms of high costs and the roles of private insurance. What is not at the forefront of the conversation is the lack of doctors—the actual people needed to make medical care and services possible. In rural communities, approximately 1 in 10 doctors are practicing leaving roughly […]

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Smiling Female Doctor

Celebrate Women Physicians

1849. A historic year for female physicians as Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell was the first woman ever to become a physician.  Her efforts blazed the way for women all throughout the country to pursue their medical dreams and take on leadership roles as physicians. This past week, February 3rd, marked what would have been Dr. Blackwell’s […]

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OECD Spending Under Half of US Healthcare Spend

A Reason for Double the Spending on Healthcare

It’s no surprise that U.S. healthcare is of popular conversation and controversy. A new analysis from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health—a revamp of a 2003 report from Princeton healthcare economist Uwe Reinhardt—found that Americans spend more than double the amount on healthcare than in other countries.  This is not due to people in […]

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One in Six Healthcare Workers Are Immigrants

Study Finds 1 in 6 Healthcare Workers Are Immigrants

According to the Journal of the American Medical Association, roughly one in six medical professionals are foreign-born, many working in rural or undeserved communities. These areas struggle to attract U.S.-born med school grads. The study, which estimated the proportion of non-US-born and non citizen healthcare professionals in the U.S. in 2016 by using self-reported data […]

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Fountain of Youth

The Fountain of Youth

Stay young forever—that’s the dream (or at least for some people). Ambrosia Medical—a startup—is trying to capitalize on that desire. The company fills the veins of older people with fresh blood from young donors. The idea being that the blood will help conquer aging by rejuvenate the body’s organs. By the end of this year, […]

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New Study Finds Danger in Eating Centipedes

Don’t eat raw centipedes. That piece of advice may seem commonsense, but in China, centipedes are used in traditional medicine. Typically prescribed for epilepsy, stroke, cancer, tetanus or rheumatoid arthritis, the arthropods are supposed to be ingested dried, powdered or after being steeped in alcohol—not raw. Scientists in China found evidence that eating raw centipedes […]

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Free rides and meals from insurance help patients' health.

Keeping Patients Healthy

Typically, insurers reimburse for procedures and services for patients, but for some, that is slowly starting to shift. Many insurance companies are focusing on preventative health, meaning they deliver fresh meals to those with special medical conditions or pay for social workers who visit stroke victims. In one specific example, one woman receives free rides […]

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